Polaroids of film

The Guardian website is currently home to some Polaroid photographs taken on set by Andrei Tarkovsky.

film.guardian.co.uk/gall/0,8544,1226197,00.html

The photos are selections from the new book, Instant Light Tarkovsky Polaroids, published by Thames and Hudson.

Andrei Tarkovsky, the best film director that ever lived - in my opinion - took the photographs on set in Russia and Italy between 1979 and 1984.

Responsible for such masterpieces as Mirror, Andrei Rublev and Solaris - no, not that piece of crap remake by Stephen Soderberg - Tarkovsky was a true vituoso of cinematography.

Particularly astonishing is Stalker. A visual and intellectual feast, it tells the story of a lone - and lonely - man who is paid to escort two other, deeply flawed men, one a professor and the other a writer, into a mysterious area called 'the Zone'.

Without a doubt a titan of film-making, Tarkovsky's movies are stunning in every way. As a challenge I suggest pausing a DVD copy of Stalker at any random scene and considering how perfectly composed the shot will be. Any single frame is an image worthy of being a painting or photograph.

Despite the limited technology of a Polaroid camera, these images give an interesting insight into how Tarkovsky composed his work.

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