Intro

The Golden Hour is a phrase that comes up a lot when talking with photographers. It refers to the period of time directly after sunrise or sunset, where the light emitted from the sun appears in the sky as a soft orangey red colour rather than the bright blue seen throughout the rest of the day, giving your photos a warm, golden glow that flatters skin tones and adds beautiful colour to landscape images.

The Golden Hour is caused by the sun being much lower in the sky and the rays of light needing to travel through a greater depth of Earth's atmosphere to reach us, scattering the blue light so that more of the opposite end of the spectrum is visible. As this happens, it also reduces the lighting ratio between direct light from the sun and ambient illumination, creating softer shadows and highlights that are far more flattering than the hard contrasts of midday sun.

Although referred to as an 'hour' of time, the actual length of the Golden Hour depends on both the time of year and your location. Those living closer to the equator will have less time, whilst those closer to the poles could potentially have 'Golden Days' during some season. Shooting very early in the morning of later in the evening takes some serious dedication, but if you're up for the challenge, here are some tips to help you make the most of the Golden Hour.