Top advice on creating characters that players want to know and love.

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The majority of modern games contain characters. Some characters the player is supposed to like, some are to be feared and fought against, and some others become an extension of the player. We have been surrounded by characters from stories all of our lives, from fairytales to breakfast cereal boxes – so why is it so difficult to create successful ones for games?
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I feel there are two main reasons for this. First of all, creating a good character takes a lot more time and energy than a game production schedule usually allows it; a high-end animated movie studio will spend many months getting a character exactly right, while a game studio rarely prioritizes the process to a similar degree. 
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But when you think about it, a movie character is only on screen for two hours or even less, while a player can spend days or even weeks with a game character. Shouldn’t they warrant similar creative attention?
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Secondly, I feel that the majority of people working in the games industry have little or no experience in other character-based entertainment media (movie, TV, fiction) and therefore have little knowledge of character and story development outside the very basic levels that have been accepted by gaming audiences of the past.
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But if games are to fulfil their potential and embrace a larger, more demanding audience they are going to have to learn a thing or two from the forms of entertainment the world is more familiar with, such as TV and movies, ones that focus on characters and stories. 
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Although computer games have grown into a fledgling storytelling media of their own, their roots remain in ones and zeros – the focus of development is on graphics, game play mechanics, and code. And while I fully acknowledge that ugly graphics or lousy game play cannot be salvaged by interesting characters, the ‘creative layer’ of a game (subject, setting, story, and style) can be the factor that determines whether or not a potential player picks up your title off a shelf. 
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We have reached a point in the industry where information processing and image display limitations have all but vanished, where dramatic camera sweeps and photo-real textures are everyday occurrences. We now have polygon counts that make your head swim.
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What’s the next step? How can we move into the world of mainstream entertainment media and create consistently engaging characters that do not leave the player feeling hollow? What follows is a process for character development that attempts to take into account the issues that are common to all character-based media and those that are unique to games. 
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Start by asking yourself the following questions:
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<h2>Question 1<br>What purpose does this Character need to fulfil?</h2>
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