• Price: 102

  • Company: Nikon

  • Pros: Excellent rendering and print quality, plus unique and relatively easy-to-use U Point technology does away with complex masking techniques.

  • Cons: On anything other than high-end hardware, it’s sluggish. And, while the layout doesn’t feel particularly intuitive, the built-in browser is horrible to use.

  • Our Rating: We rate this 7 out of 10 We rate this 7 out of 10

Capture NX is Nikon’s new RAW conversion utility. It was created in collaboration with independent developer Nik Software, and replaces Nikon’s Capture 4.

Unlike earlier versions of Nikon’s proprietary camera RAW file (NEF) editor, NX can be used to edit JPGs and TIF files as well as RAW (NEF) files from the company’s new updated flagship model, the D2Xs. Similarly, all previous Nikon digital SLR NEF files are supported, too, but NX can’t edit RAW files from other manufacturers, and neither can you upgrade from Capture 4.4.

 align=right border=0 />You may be surprised to learn that Nikon has removed tethered shooting – for that you’ll need to spend an extra £25 for Camera Control Pro (right). However, separating the two functions makes sense, especially if you’re an ardent supporter of third-party conversion utilities, such as Bibble Pro. 
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Even so, apart from the expected and extensive RAW-editing features, NX includes the features that made the original Capture utility stand out. These include automatic vignetting correction and the clever dust-cancelling feature, using a reference photo of any dust specks on the filter-pack. You can edit levels and curves, and perform red-eye reduction. Nikon’s D-lighting exposure enhancement feature is lifted from the company’s Coolpix cameras.
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Nikon’s U Point technology allows you to add Control Points within an image. These let you make quick adjustments for colour, brightness, contrast, and more, without having to resort to time-consuming masks.
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It works well once you get the hang of it, and it works with NEFs, TIFs, and JPGs, though the technique is destructive. 
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<div class=floatedimage><img src= Print

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