• Price: 169

  • Pros: Good set of polygon tools essentially like those in Amapi, subdivision smoothing.

  • Cons: Modelling history can be untrustworthy and confusing at times, workflow could be better as could mouse/hotkey view navigation, still a bit of a glitchy release.

  • Our Rating: We rate this 7 out of 10 We rate this 7 out of 10

Hexagon, the latest release from Eovia, is a dedicated 3D polygon modeller. The company already has a handful of 3D programs in the form of Carrara and Amapi. Eovia offers yet more 3D products on its Web site – you can buy DAZ and Pandromeda products, including MojoWorld and Bryce, at Eovia online.

Hexagon slots into the Carrara family of products. Eovia’s product roster is bewildering compared to most 3D companies but its products are specifically engineered and marketed to different kinds of users.

 border=0 />Even a passing glance at Hexagon reveals that it clearly has its heritage rooted in Amapi, Eovia’s high-end polygon and NURBS modelling system. Unlike Amapi (which is offered in two versions, at significantly higher prices) Hexagon does not offer a NURBS tool set, though there are a number of NURBS-like operations that come straight out of Amapi’s handbook. Veteran Amapi users will immediately recognize Ruled, Coons, and Gordons surfaces, which in the case of Hexagon only generate polygonal sheets rather than resolution-independent NURBS surfaces.
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Primarily, Hexagon is designed as a polygon/subdivision surface modeller, and as such is suitable for all kinds of detailed organic and mechanical modelling tasks. Eovia are aiming the product at illustrators, designers, and 3D artists, as well as advanced 3D modellers and animators. The look-&-feel of the program is reminiscent of Luxology’s Modo which is probably no accident. Although it’s not in direct competition, Hexagon does offer a similar level of SubD toolset, though not the specific workflow and flexibility that Modo’s high-end market demands.
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When launched, Hexagon presents a well laid-out charcoal grey interface that certainly looks like it means business. Dark grey is actually a good colour for 3D interfaces, since it helps the bulk of the interface recede so you can focus on modelling for hours on end with less eye strain. There’s a large 3D OpenGL view flanked by a tool strip at the top and bottom and info panels and managers to the right.
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<b>Slow work</b>
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