Best Buy
  • Price: £70.83 plus VAT

  • Company: Wacom

  • Our Rating: We rate this 9 out of 10 We rate this 9 out of 10

If you don't want to shell out for one of Wacom's new Cintiq Companions (whether in Android or Windows 8 flavours) or any other more expensive tablet, this is the kit for you.

The Wacom Creative Stylus gives you the tip senstivity of a Cintiq pen – that''s 2,048 levels of pressure sensitivity, fact fans – and the professional, lightweight feel shared by the other Wacom stylus products. But instead of spending a grand or so on a completely new tablet, the Creative Stylus gives you this on your iPad for just over £70 plus VAT.

Link it up to your iPad mini, iPad 3 or iPad 4 through Bluetooth 4.0 and you've got a ready made cinitiq, to all intents and purposes. If you aren't ready to splash the cash on the Cintiq range, the Creative Stylus will fill that gap and make drawing and painting way easier on the iPad.

Wacom Creative Stylus vs Bamboo Stylus

Having used the Bamboo Stylus for some time the other day – and a host of other drawing implements for tablets over the past few years – I was pleasantly surprised by how familiar the Creative Stylus felt while drawing. It has the same feel and aesthetic of the classic tablet pen, though slightly smaller and formed with aluminium.

The Creative Stylus is lightweight, and easy to handle. I also liked the blue colour cause it's pretty (shown below), though you can also get it in black (further below) on for a more traditional Wacom look.

I've seen a lot of feedback about the nipple-like tip, with some users concerned about the top heaviness of the nib. I'm actually a fan of the nib on the Creative Stylus – if you're on a train, it won't slip and you can just practice getting used to the top heavy feel of it, and if you're used to other stylus pens for ipad then it won't take long to get the hang of the Intuos. The nib is very effective for colour blocking, and I like the softness of the tip for the finer line work. It responds well to even the slightest pressure.

The reason I could go out and buy this is it's portable, easy to use and does exactly what it says on the box. The battery life is reportedly 150 hours and powered with one AAAA battery, and the travel box is small enough to not be a bother when going from job to job.

Neither of the Cintiq Companions I tried managed to really fill the gap between the tablet and the massive Cintiq 24hd. However, with one simple purchase of the Creative Stylus, this is a much more affordable and sensible way of being able to get the feel of a Cintiq at a fraction of the cost – especially if you have an iPad already. It allows you the best drawing experience closest to that of a big Cintiq, at a very low price.

Wacom Creative Stylus supported apps

Support for the Creative Stylus is pretty good already: with the likes of Autodesk SketchBook Pro, ArtRage and ProCreate already supported and Psykopaint coming soon – though there's seems to be confirmed plans to bring support to Adobe Photoshop Touch.

I've read a few cons from some users already; you have to reconnect the pen move between different apps. And the nib hasn't got the same feel as the old styluses. However, I feel that the Wacom Creative Stylus for the iPad is the best solution to those looking for a Cintiq feel, without the balls to go on a bank heist.

Would I buy it? Yep.