• Price: 382

  • Company: Nikon

  • Pros: High picture quality (at low ISOs); handy image stabilization; exposure control and small, well-built body.

  • Cons: Occasionally tardy auto-focus operation; unreliable GPS operation; Raw file not officially supported on Mac OS X.

  • Our Rating: We rate this 7 out of 10 We rate this 7 out of 10

Geo-tagging using the built-in GPS transceiver should be a neat addition, but in the time we had with the camera (a week and a bit in all), we couldn’t get the P6000 to locate a single satellite. Left to record GPS data, the P6000 will drain the small but potent battery, even when you think it has powered down completely. So in our view it would be best to manually update when needed.

A rubber bung covers the ethernet socket on the underside of the camera, but it’s used to exclusively upload re-sized snaps and video clips to Nikon’s complimentary My Picturetown server. It seems a little extravagant to us, but it could be transformed into a useful option with a future firmware upgrade.



Fortunately autofocus operation is quicker, but it’s still a little sluggish at the longer end of the zoom where the maximum aperture drops from f/2.8 to f/5.6. Accuracy appears much the same – that’s to say it’s good, with the Nikkor-branded zoom delivering pin-sharp shots with only marginal fringing. We can’t get too excited about the huge sensitivity range (64-6400 ISO): if you go above ISO 400 the speckles look like confetti.

So, while the main camera features work as well as can be expected, with a heavy ticket, the value of the seemingly unreliable geo-tagging feature and unnecessary ethernet option are questionable. You can buy the P6000 for the dollar equivalent in the US – and we rather suspect that’s closer to its true worth.