Serge Seidlitz is a London-based illustrator with a bold and graphic, cartoony style. He shares his portfolio here with Digital Arts.

Where did you train?

I studied Graphic Design at Camberwell College Of Art

What kinds of tools, materials and tech do you work with and why?

Traditionally pen, pencil, Freehand MX, Illustrator and Photoshop but I’ve recently been working on a Wacom Cintiq which has completely revolutionised my working process. It’s like going from a horse and cart to a tractor! I’m able to take on more work as I have less pencilling, scanning, cleaning up, and inking to do.

What techniques and approaches do you use most?

My main technique is drawing and layering in Photoshop. I used to do a lot more work on paper and then scan it and clean it up to create the bold lines

Which clients have you worked for?

Coke, Vodafone, MTV, Orange, Sony, Guardian, NY Times, Honda, British Airways, Nokia, Samsung, Mojo, Barclays, Virgin, VH1, Cartoon Network, LA Times and loads more.

Where have you exhibited your work?

I had a solo show in London in 2012 at the Coningsby gallery, It was really challenging to fill up a gallery and I had to think of interesting ways to fill the walls and make people buy my stuff. I had hand woven rugs made in Nepal which helped take up the whole of the back wall and then I filled the rest of the space with screen prints. I spent a couple of months at Print Club in London hand printing them all which was hard work but lots of fun.

What are your biggest influences?

So many to choose from, but I love Saul Steinberg and Tadanori Yoko. I used to read Mad magazine religiously which must have rubbed off on me. I also collected all the Freak Brothers comics until my mum chucked them out when I moved out and I’ve never got round to replacing them! Obviously everyone is indebted to Robert Crumb to some degree.

What has been your favourite piece you've created and why?

Lately, a series of ice cream tubs for an Australian brand called Homer Hudson. The theme of the ice cream range was ‘The American Dream’ and the different flavours had great neames like ‘Choc N’ Awe’, ‘Prom Queen Dream’ and ‘Death Row’. So it was really fun to explore those themes in the brief. I like doing packaging as there’s something very satisfying about seeing your work on the shelves in a shop.

What's your advice for creatives aspiring to work in the design industry?

I feel that students today almost have too much access to other designers and illustrator's portfolios. When I was at art college I had a Hotmail account that I checked once a month in case my mum had emailed me, and there weren’t that many websites to look at. I think that allows you to be more creative without being distracted by the millions of other people's amazing work. So maybe I would advise students to ignore what other people are doing and do your own thing and let it develop naturally. Copying other people's styles is really pointless.

What has inspired you most recently?

Having said that (above) , I was incredibly inspired by listening to other creatives talking about their work at Offset festival in Dublin

What are you working on now?

I’ve just finished doing a cover for the Guardian’s Festival special 2014 pullout section. I’ve got a couple more of the summer festival crowd scene style illustrations, which I really love, as I get to draw loads of different characters doing silly things.

You can find and commission Serge online, represented by Bernstein & Andriulli

What's your dream commission?

I must say that I’ve already had a lot of dream commissions. I still get excited about doing newspaper commissions and advertising work, it’s always fun to see your work on a billboard on a tube platform. I’d love to do a chain of fast food restaurants one day or an aeroplane.That would be fun and highly unlikely, but one thing I’ve learnt is that you never know what the next job might be.

An illustration to accompany a spread about efficiency in the work place for Business Week Magazine