Julie Morton has worked for leading graphic design agencies in the UK and New Zealand, and has more than 20 years experience in design and marketing.

Her design range is as far-reaching as here clients: crossing identity, brand creation, corporate literature, marketing campaigns, direct mail, digital and print advertising, event collateral, exhibitions, presentations and web design.

Where did you train and what did you specialise in?

I studied at Dunedin School of Art, Otago Polytechnic in New Zealand. Although I majored in Photography, I maintained a very keen interest in the fledging Computer Art department throughout my course, which at the time was a room full of uninspiring beige Amigas situated in an old prefab.

This was the early 1990s so no Apple and no Adobe [hardware or software] – just some very basic blocky image programmes. Think Minecraft and you’re almost there…

What tools do you work with?

Being a devotee of all things Apple these days, I use a 27” iMac in the office, and iPad or laptop when I’m on the move or presenting digitally to clients.

I primarily work in Adobe Creative Suite for most projects, InDesign for layout design and Photoshop for image manipulation and screen work. I sometimes still mourn for the loss of Macromedia FreeHand, though...

What approaches do you use most?

My techniques and approaches vary from project to project.

When designing for screen I live in a Photoshop world, enjoying the immediacy of online projects going live once the client is happy. I partner with web developers when coding is required, preferring to focus my energies on the visual aspects of a project.

In print – and if the budget allows – I like using specialist papers and high-end finishes such as foiling, spot-varnish or embossing to elevate the work into a tactile, expressive piece of design. Even in this screen-driven age, I find people still like to be connected through the sense of touch paper gives. Photography and illustration also profile heavily in my work.

What has been your favourite piece you’ve created and why?

My next commission, always. I am currenting working on a couple of exciting projects – a wine label for an Argentine wine merchant and visual identity for a start-up interior designer.

Which clients have you worked for?

I’ve been lucky enough to work with clients large and small, both here and overseas. These include Adobe, Cancer Research, Dell, Digital Arts, Historic Royal Palaces, HP, International Tennis Federation, Macworld, The National Archives, PC Advisor, Savills and Voog Wines.

What would be your one piece of advice for creatives aspiring to work in the design industry?

Ask questions, stay inspired and love what to do. It will show.