George McCallum is an illustrator and maker who lives and works in London, and trained at the University of the West of England. He enjoys word play and likes to apply a sense of humour to his work.

George specialises in working three-dimensionally and likes the idea of using whatever material best fits the brief, whether it be MDF, pen and paper or cake mix.

What are your favourite tools?

I love my spray gun, jigsaw and box of paints. Digitally, I use Adobe Photoshop.

What techniques and approaches do you use most?

I love the idea of looking at mundane and everyday objects and approaching them from a different perspective. I like to do things that people would think too ridiculous to actually invest time in doing. Playing with words and images is something that I find fun, too.

Where have you exhibited your work?

D&AD, Let Me Illustrate at the Grant Bradley gallery, Art Wank, the Tate Gallery Sydney Australia, WMH Solo window display showcase and Illustrato.rs presents Lineup Illustration Art Expo at the Mall Galleries.

Who and what are your biggest influences?

I really like the work of Memphis Milano. I'm also really inspired by the stuff we surround ourselves with, the everyday objects that we use but don't really think about.

What has inspired you most recently?

Hand drawn type on the sides of bins.

What are you working on now?

A few things. I'm making some giant feet that I'm planning on putting in the doors of people I want to get work from. I'm also building a bird house based on a million pound mansion that was taken over by squatters. I've started planning my own funeral for a solo exhibition that I want to put on, too.

What's your dream commission?

To make an installation that takes over a whole house, where everything in it would have a double meaning. The blinds would blink at you, the chairs would be made of arms and the wardrobes would explode when opened.

Failing that it would be brilliant to see my work move so perhaps some kind of animation project.

Chest of Draws is George's favourite piece. He spend a month working on it, and liked how a silly idea could be made into a physical object. It was also one of the first 3D pieces he made.