Ever wanted to use the iconic typefaces from the logos of television shows you’ve come to love - such as The Simpsons and Seinfeld - in your own design project?

We bet you didn’t know that the different coloured dots in between the seven letters of the Friends logo represents the different friends within the show, or that the typeface for Full House even though it looks like it should be from the 80s, is actually based on 1950s hand-painted signs.

Interactive content marketing platform Ceros has created a new hub where you can find out more interesting facts like this, but more importantly, all the download links for typefaces used in the logos of the best 90s TV shows. Some download links lead to typeface replicas of the exact logotype - such as DaFont's Buffied for Buffy the Vampire Slayer, and The Fresh Prince free font. Others link to the exact typeface, such as Gloucester MT Extra Condensed, Italicised (by Monotype) used for the Seinfeld logo. 

Click here to download 90s TV show typefaces. 

The microsite includes links for the hand-drawn feel of Friends, the strangely 1980s horror style of the Baywatch logo, or the urban kid graffiti vibe for The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air among others.

The microsite says with the rise of digital design tools in the late 1980s and early 1990s, old rules buckled to innovation. Many new graphic styles followed, which came to define the era rooted in "remixing and experimentation". One of the best examples of this seen in the typefaces for 90s TV shows.

The website lists all the shows, links to download their iconic typefaces (some are free, some aren't) and the original designer of the typeface. Typography expert Alexander Tochilovsky shares his analysis on each one. Alexander is the design curator of the Herb Lublin Study Centre of Design and Typography in New York City - set up to preserve Herb Lublin’s vast collection of typography work during 1950 to 1980. He teaches typography and graphic design at the Cooper Union, Fordham University, City College and SUNY Purchase.

The site is part of a wider upcoming Ceros project - the launch of a new product feature, the font explorer. This has been created to make it easy for designers and marketers to use any font they like without much effort on their part.