London-based agency Studio Output describes the creative process behind refreshing the branding, website and on-screen animation for the BBC's coverage of Glastonbury Festival.

Glastonbury opened its gates to the first bout of festival-goers this morning in preparation for the opening acts to take to the stage on Friday. The BBC will be covering the festival all weekend, and Studio Output is the firm behind the refresh of the BBC at Glastonbury branding, website and on-screen animation for 2013's event.

Studio Output explains that the brief for the identity refresh was to recognise and connect with new audiences without alienating those familiar with BBC at Glastonbury. "Think Beyoncé!" was the instruction that summed up the focus on bigger shows and greater mainstream appeal to audiences.

2011's BBC at Glastonbury identity
Studio Output has reimagined the identity for 2013, from the typography down to the pyramid.

The studio began by tweaking the identity's existing typography to improve legibility, and then used dynamic light effects to recreate the pyramid. "The effect is like standing in front of the main stage, caught in the glare of either summer sunlight or phasing lightwalls," Studio Output describes.

Studio Output worked with motion experts FOUND to create the animated sting: "The reveal builds to a crescendo of triangular light that defines the symbolic nature of the Pyramid Stage."

The Pyramid Stage will be graced by the likes of Arctic Monkeys, The Rolling Stones and Mumford & Sons during Glastonbury Festival this weekend, which is expected to attract around 135,000 attendees.

"We also applied the idea of layered light to the relevant BBC webpage background and rolled out the visual identity across extra promotional materials," Studio Output adds. You can see the finished webpage here.

As well as being the agency behind 2013's BBC at Glastonbury identity, London-based Studio Output is also known for its involvement in Attraction, the world's biggest musical at Beijing's Olympic Stadium, as well as series of projection-mapped PlayStation ads that attracted millions of viewers on YouTube and The Cartograph, an interactive exhibition using Google Maps.