The BBC has announced plans to form partnerships with industry to inspire children to use digital technology creatively and explore computer coding.

In today’s debate over the lack of computing skills among young people and the technology sector’s skills shortage in the UK, the organisation has been frequently praised for putting the BBC Micro personal computer (above) into schools over 30 years ago, which prompted the previous generation’s interest in technology and programming.

Ralph Rivera, director of Future Media at the BBC, said: “The BBC has played a hugely important role inspiring a generation of digital and technology leaders in the past, but now it’s time to reignite that creativity.

“We want to transform the nation’s ability and attitude towards coding, and bring together different organisations already working in this area.”

Under the new initiative, the BBC plans to work closely with local, national and international partners from a range of sectors, including technology companies, the government and educators.

It will reveal details of partnerships over the coming months, and said that it expects the initiative to start to make an impact from 2015.

Danny Cohen, director of BBC Television, said: “We'll harness the power of our biggest platforms and services, create partnerships and commission programmes to get people excited about computing again and help young people build the technologies and businesses of the future.”

From 2014, the new national curriculum for computing, which aims to teach children programming, will come into force in England and Wales.