While much of the attention on creative side of the London 2012 Olympics has been on the prohibative restrictions on using terms such as London and Olympics – and some strong reactions to it – some artists and designers are embracing the Games wholeheardedly and letting it inspire personal projects. One such artist is Adam Ismail – creator a recent tutorial for us on his cosmic style – who has produced works to support his (and our) home team, Team GB.

Adam has created a series of works based around the concepts of 'Focus, Dream, Succeed'. We caught up with him to find out more about the project.

DA: Why did you create these pieces?

AI: "I created these pieces to celebrate our country hosting the Olympic Games and to show my individual support to Team GB in this years Games through my style of digital art."

DA: What does the Olympics – and specifically it being in London – mean to you?

AI: "As a fan of sport, I am particularly excited at the prospect of having the greatest global sporting event in our back garden this year.

"Not only is it a proud moment for all the competing athletes but we can also be proud of our country in hosting such a massive event."

DA: How did you arrive at the concept of 'Focus, Dream, Succeed'?

AI: "What separates champions from the rest of the field of competitors is their ability to focus under enormous pressure in order to succeed. Every athlete is pursuing their dream to win an olympic medal and gain recognition as the best in their sport."

DA: How did you decide on the colour scheme for the pieces?

AI: "The colour scheme takes a direct influence from the Union Jack, utilising the red, white and blue synonymous with Great Britain to link each of the individual pieces and then combining all three colours together for the final combined artwork.

"The colours also had to work with their respective theme word, so the blue is linked to calmness, direction and 'focus', white to tranquility, foresight and 'dream' and red to passion, competitiveness and 'succeed'.

"Because of the global nature of the Olympics, I also used a variety of colours within the motion lines of the artworks to represent other competing countries."

DA: Take us through your creative process for the artworks?

AI: "Starting within Daz Studio, I built up the features and positioning of the figure. Working on the exported render, I first masked the face and placed onto a black background. Using a combination of filters, overlays and colour effects I adjusted the face to one of the three main theme colours.

"Taking a crop from an abstract photo of lights, I warped and twisted to create strong framing lines for the face, then using a great app called Fumy, I created a variety of finer motion colour lines to overlay onto the face. Added to this were small and medium 'particles' to add to the sense of movement within the artwork. The piece was finished with added gradient overlays, adjustment layers and filters.

DA: Did you consciously choose to avoid any explicit mention of the Olympics or its branding on the pieces?

AI: "There was a conscious decision to avoid the explicit branding at present, due to the rather constrained usage set out.

"Also, I didn't mention the olympics specifically on the artworks as I felt that I wanted the link to be obvious without the need to mention it directly."