Neutrino has released a free iPhone and iPad app called Rock Show. It allows the user to browse limited edition gig posters -- and buy them -- as well as providing a link to iTunes so that the user can purchase songs by the musical artists shown.

Notable figures in the poster world include Bill Graham, Dennis King, Chris Shaw to name but a few. Bristol based company ‘Jacknife’ created by Chris Hopewell has designed and made posters for music artists such as Queens Of The Stone Age (below), Eagles Of Death Metal and Seasick Steve.

Rock posters as an artform have been around as long as Rock n' Roll itself, birthed from San Francisco concert halls in the 1960s. The 1960s were the epitome of the ‘hippie culture’, a hedonistic age where everything was changing. Rock promoted self-expression and art collided with this. This freedom from control produced a very stylistic approach to the design of the posters.

Previous to this era little artistic flair was involved in the production of gig posters. The new style brought about experimental colour and lettering, which had its importance weighted on the look as opposed to how it could be read. It became the first commercial art form where the artists’ statement had more weight then what was being advertised.


[poster by Chris King]


[poster by Ken Taylor]

Screen printing was a popular method to producing these posters and still is today but with the development of the digital era many artists are either choosing to create their posters through a combination of hand-drawn work which is then scanned into the computer and then worked upon or creating their work purely digitally in Photoshop or Illustrator.