Back in April we covered #PoweredbyTweets, a challenge that invited entrants to submit ideas that either solved a problem using Twitter or created something beautiful using Twitter data.

The results of that challenge have been chosen and turned into a innovative installation at Somerset House as part of the London Design Festival.

Six winning ideas from the challenge are on display, each showcasing a way that Twitter can be used to bring ideas and objects to life.

The six ideas have been brought to life by design agency Bureau De Change and build agency Pixie Labs

Pigeon Air Patrol, by Pierre Duquesnoy and Matt Daniels, won the Solve A Problem category. It proposes a flock of pigeons monitoring the quality of the air and reporting back in real time on Twitter. Each pigeon will be equipped with a backpack capable of measuring carbon monoxide and nitrogen dioxide levels in the atmosphere.

The winner of the Create Something Beautiful category was #PUTREDBACK, which highlights that there is a shortage of blood across the UK, but by law, gay men are not allowed to donate blood.

Vincent Versluis, Florian Hollander and Oliver Dennis (Cheil)  came up with the idea for the exhibit, which features a flag shaped installation filled with different colour liquids, resembling the rainbow flag. Each tweet will add a symbolic drop of blood, slowly putting red back in the rainbow.

Runner up in this category is The Social Mindscape, by Adeola Akande and Eloise Parfitt of Guy’s and St Thomas’ Hospital, London. It proposes to harness the power of Twitter to enable cancer patients receiving chemotherapy to communicate non-verbally and create a visual mindscape they can collectively enjoy in real time. Chemotherapy can be a traumatic and exhausting, so mindscape will provide an uplifting distraction from the natural anxieties of waiting and receiving treatment.

Word By Word (pictured, top), by Jeremy Garner, Dom Fisher, Yvain Granier, Pierre Briffaut and Albert Seleznyov (Hive Works), uses Twitter to reveal a previously unreleased book word by word. Each word of the book is ‘released’ by Twitter in real time. As a Tweet appears somewhere in the world containing the next word of the book, so Word By Word will release the book’s next word - until the entire book has been gradually revealed. The centrepiece in the exhibition is a typewriter, which types the next word in the manuscript whenever a Tweet is detected that contain it.

The exhibition runs from September 21st – 27th and is free to enter.