While judging this year's D&AD Awards, six top talents tell us what they've learned from what they saw.

Last week saw the judging of the D&AD Awards 2013, which awards the best professional advertising and creative work from the around the world. Six judges took time after casting their experienced eyes over work entered from around the world to give us an overview of what they've seen that's impressed them most – and how those works tell us about wider trends across graphic and interactive design.

There's an overall feeling that, as ex-creative director of The Guardian Mark Porter puts it, "we're still in the early stages of understanding what 'digital' is". We're still often impressed by new technologies for the achievement of creating them rather than for the concept behind them or for what they can do – and, as Ian Tait, executive creative director at Google Creative Labs and foreman of the digital advertising jury, points it out, it's tricky to spot the difference between things brands build that are truly innovative and those that are just PR puff.

However, as David Hillman – who's jury foreman for the Graphic Design category this year – says, there's more evidence of work with very strong concepts behind them – so it's clear that creative agencies are still understanding that a great idea at the core of a campaign is still essential.

The spotted trends don't just apply to digital though. For example, David and fellow member of the Graphic Design jury, Hector Pottie from Figtree Design, both remark on the strength of work from Asia – especially Japan.

Watch the videos above and below to learn more.

Hector Pottie, head of creative at Figtree discusses the challenges of judging graphic design work in Asian scripts.
In the Magazine & Newspaper Design category, Mark Porter, former creative director of The Guardian turned consultant, unsurprisingly found more digital publications being entered, but alongside their print versions rather than instead of them.
Ian Tait, executive creative director at Google Creative Labs and foreman of the digital advertising jury discusses the difference between things brands build that are truly innovative and those that are just PR puff.
Priya Prakash, founder of Designing For Social Change, talks about the latest trends in mobile marketing.
Tom Hingston on how bringing together creatives from different disciplines helps you learn from each other's experiences.