The Wall Street Journal and National Public Radio have announced plans to create Flash-free versions of their websites for iPad users.

Apple's iPhone, iPod touch and forthcoming iPad don't run Flash despite Adobe claiming Flash is currently used in more than 85 per cent of websites, including the BBC, around the world.

However, Apple's Steve Jobs has said that if Flash was enabled on the device, it would only have a battery life of 1.5 hours. "Apple does not support Flash because it is so buggy." Wired claimed Jobs said.

When users visit the redesigned websites they will be diverted to a Flash-free page. "Visitors to the newspaper's front page will see an iPad-specific, Flash-free page," Peter Kafka, who works for MediaMemo, said of the WSJ's iPad website.

This news comes following Virgin America's decision to removed all Flash content from its page in order to allow iPhone users to access flight details. Virgin America chief technology officer, Ravi Simhambhatla, told The Register, "I don't want to cater to one hardware or one software platform one way to another, and Flash eliminates iPhone users."

Both NPR and WSJ are also creating App Store software for the iPad. Kafka was not given a preview of either of these apps, however.

Head of digital media for NPR, Kinsey Wilson, did comment on what the experience would be like, however. "Wilson says that while iPhone apps are a ‘very intentional experience' - you load the thing up and seek out specific content - he thinks the iPad will be a ‘lean back device'," Kafka explained. "That's traditionally the distinction multimedia types use to differentiate between a computer and a TV. Intriguing."