Adobe has used its Max 2013 conference in Los Angeles to show off features it's planning to add to its tools beyond the launch of CC versions of what used to be Creative Suite on June 17.

As you can see in the videos above and below, Adobe is working on new tools for Photoshop, After Effects, the DPS tablet-publishing system from InDesign, Muse and Edge Code. The company says that "projects shown may, or may not, make it into future versions of Adobe products and services" – but all software developers always add that caveat to things they're working on so they're not legally conscripted in the US to follow through on those plans.

The company is also making its first foray into creative hardware with the Mighty and Napolean pen and ruler, which we covered yesterday.

Adobe showed a Photoshop feature running purely online, and made better over time thanks to crowdsourcing. The new Perspective Warp feature for Photoshop (above) lets users adjust the perspective for parts of a shot while still keeping the rest of the image intact.

A new feature for both Photoshop and After Effects lets users experiment and play with lighting after the fact (above), tweaking image lighting in both video and photos based on a selected sample. Also for video, Adobe demoed a new technology for separating desired audio from background noise using a visual interface (below).

DPS Special Effects for digital publications created using InDesign will gain animation, special effects and accelerometer-based movement. The InDesign-for-web-design application Muse will gain colour transformations and 3D motion.

The Edge Code coding environment was shown with Edge Reflow-style responsive site creation tools and the ability to open PSD comps as code. The software will also gain navigation and debugging of Asynchronous JavaScript in Brackets.

Adobe has also shown off a different type of tech to its usual making tools. It showcased Liquid Search, which is almost the Draw Something of search – where draw what they're searching for an Liquid Search goes off to find it.