Amidst a consensus of speculation that Microsoft’s Xbox Next (Xbox 2) won't be backwards compatible, hope appears for Microsoft's next-generation console to support Xbox games.

Xbox specialist site reports that Transitive has announced QuickTransit, an application that would allow for software to be run across different processors and operating systems without any source code changes -- boasting "100 per cent functionality, transparent interactive and graphics performance" and "near-native computational performance."

In an interview with, Transitive CEO Bob Wiederhold gave an example of QuickTransit allowing the next-generation Xbox running the original Xbox software. "One of the key breakthroughs is performance. You can't tell the difference between a translated application and a native application," said Wiederhold.

Interestingly enough, the company's official page shows a diagram of a PowerPC processor emulating an x86 game. Coincidentally (or not), the Xbox Next runs on a PowerPC platform, while the Xbox runs on a PC-like Intel chipset.

Transitive has no known ties to Microsoft, but has noted that it signed agreements with "six of the world's largest computer OEMs" for "customer-written software support for their platforms" and that "strict confidentiality obligations prevent us from saying more about these relationships at this time"--raising the possibility that the two companies are working together to bring backwards compatibility to the Xbox Next.