Sony has said it has developed a large-size prototype full-color organic electroluminescence display (OELD). OELDs consume much less power than existing LCDs (liquid crystal displays) and are expected to be widely used in portable devices in a few years. The prototype has a diagonal width of 13 inches (32.5 cm) and a resolution of 800-x-600 pixels. Other features of the panel are a 0.33mm-pixel pitch and peak intensity of 300 candela per square meter. With the announcement, Sony becomes one of only a handful of companies to have announced the development of full-color OELDs. OELDs are being eyed as replacements for current-generation TFT (thin film transistor) LCDs because of their very low power consumption. The displays also have a wide viewing angle, high contrast ratio and good color reproduction. The energy savings are realized thanks to their self-luminescence quality, which means an energy-guzzling back light is not needed. With the backlight removed, power consumption will be reduced and portable devices will be able to function for a longer time on a single set of batteries. For this reason they are expected to be first employed in cellular telephones, although several other devices, from notebook computers and personal digital assistants to portable audio/video consoles like Sony's Airboard, are also expected to include OELDs. Sony said it employed its proprietary Top emission Adaptive Current drive (TAC) technology to produce the 13-inch display - one of the largest OELDs yet announced. The method uses a larger number of transistors to maintain luminance uniformity across the entire screen, something that is a problem on screens of 10 inches or more, said Sony. It also allows for finer resolution displays and means the entire screen can be made thinner than competing panels, the maker said.