Getty Images is helping professional creatives brainstorm big ideas with an interactive online game called 'Gestalt', found at http://www.gettyimages.com/rfzone.

Patterned after Rorschach inkblot therapy designed to reveal deeper meanings, Gestalt engages players in a quick and entertaining game that refreshes their inspiration. After each "therapy session," players are entered into a daily drawing to win $1,000 as well as a drawing at the end of the promotion to win one of six exciting 'fantasy' experiences:

Animal Instinct – travel on safari in Africa with National Geographic

Speed – attend Formula 1 racing in Monaco

London Calling – attend a major sporting event in London, working alongside one of Getty Images' top photographers

Darwin's Dream – visit the Galapagos Islands with National Geographic

All-Star Game Blowout – attend an American All-Star sports fantasy weekend of the winner's choice

Fashionista – experience Fashion Week in New York City

"Our customers typically view imagery from a practical perspective – as a means of communicating with their audiences," said Robert Gubas, VP of marketing at Getty Images. "Gestalt offers them a rare opportunity to view imagery from a personal perspective as it takes shape in front of their eyes on the computer screen – or perhaps on the Tanzanian plains or one of the other fantasy experience destinations."

The game begins with players entering a virtual therapist's office, taking a seat and selecting one of three inkblots to play. For each inkblot chosen, 10 royalty-free images will appear and players will be challenged to find the image contained within the inkblot. Players will see if they selected the right inkblot as well as how fast they responded.

"When Getty Images asked us to develop an unconventional vehicle to showcase their vast selection of royalty-free imagery, our goal was to connect with customers in an intimate, exploratory way," said Dave Remer, CEO and creative director of remerinc, the creative marketing agency that designed Gestalt. "Using kitschy inkblots and tongue-in-cheek psychological phrasing, we created an online game that we believe is as rejuvenating as it is entertaining."