Chromatic aberration was not a problem in our tests shots; high-contrast areas had well-defined edges without purple fringing. We could only notice chromatic aberration when shooting silhouettes with the sun directly behind our subject.

Because the lens has such a wide angle, barrel distortion will be noticeable when you shoot straight lines. It is prevalent on horizontal and vertical lines, so it will skew the lines of buildings and other straight objects when shooting at the widest angle. For photos of people and sea life this won’t be a problem. The quality of the lens is very good, though, as our images were crisp and well detailed. You can zoom all the way in to your photos and they won’t suffer from blotchiness or overly softened edges.


The Canon PowerShot D10 has four shooting modes: auto, program, scene, and video. It is a relatively quick camera; when you press the power button it switches on and is instantly ready to shoot, and its shot-to-shot performance is not overly sluggish. However, if you take photos at ISO 400 or higher there will be a slight delay as the camera processes the image. We also noticed a delay when the camera tried to read images off a full SD card and play them back.

Other features of the Canon PowerShot D10 include optical image stabilisation, face detection, scene detection, blink detection, and motion detection. [That’s a lot of detecting! — Ed.]

Overall, we think the physical design of the Canon PowerShot D10 is spot-on for a ruggedised camera. It feels good to use and, most importantly, it’s very easy to use. We also like the clear pictures it takes, but we wish it rendered images with more contrast. By default it captures images that look too pale. However, that’s something that can be fixed during post-processing. So if you’re after a ruggedised camera for snorkelling, or just to use while you hang around the pool, the Canon PowerShot D10 is worth considering.