The beta version of Photoshop CS3 has been available since November, but Creative Suite 3 introduces an expanded version of the application called Photoshop CS3 Extended. This includes all of the features of the standard version, but adds tools for 3D artists, video editors and motion graphics artists (and architects and medical pros).

 border=0 /><BR></div>
</p>
<p>
Both versions see a performance improvement over Photoshop CS2, especially if you’re using an Intel-based Mac. Starting the application was over twice as fast on our Mac Pro, as was opening large images and many filters and tasks. We also saw an overall speed boost running CS3 under Windows Vista over CS2, though to a much smaller degree.
</p>
<p>
<b>Hanging out with models*</b>
</p>
<p>
<img src=Flash files). Users can add layers and static elements such as text and graphics.

 border=0 /><BR></div>
</p>
<p>
The most interesting video function is the ability use Photoshop’s extensive painting tools, including the new Clone Source palette (see below) which can clone from different frames, and an Onion Skinning control to see previous and next frames as you work.
</p>
<p>
These additions massively improve Photoshop’s usefulness as a rotoscoping tool, though specialists will still benefit from a focussed application with multi-frame painting tools such as <a href=Bauhaus Software’s Mirage.

Eve of destruction

Another feature taken from Adobe’s video products is the ability to modify filters after they’ve been applied – so you can change easily an effect based on its interactive with another applied later, or based on client feedback, or after you’ve re-opened an image the next day.

 border=0 /><BR></div>
</p>
<p>
<div class=floatedimage><img src=OnOne Mask Pro or Vertus Fluid Mask – and lacks those tools fine-tuning controls for dealing with tricky areas such as hair.

 border=0 /><BR></div>
</p>
<p>
<b>Combine and control</b>
</p>
<p>
Designers often have multiple photos of the same scene that they want to composite, whether to combine the best parts of different shots or remove elements such as bystanders. To make the process as swift and painless as possible, Photoshop CS3 can analyze a series of images and automatically align them to each other.
</p>
<p>
Users can then either mask out areas to let better elements show through, or let Photoshop merge the photos keeping only elements that stay the same in all shots. Merging for panoramas has also been improved.
</p>
<p>
<div class=floatedimage><img src=
Characters remaining: 335

Comments