InDesign CS2’s interface was the nearest to the new overarching Creative Suite front end and it introduced collapsing palettes versions ago, but the clean way that panels resize together is a welcome boost.

Adobe has pushed the efficiency of the interface further by offering customizable menus and workspaces, so you can move between interface layouts based on particular tasks – which is especially useful on cramped screens such as laptops – and remove tools that you have no need for, such as dynamic publishing if you never work with data.

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The interface has also been given a polish in smaller areas, such as thumbnails in the Pages panel to make navigating through long documents easier.
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One issue to be aware of if you’re thinking of upgrading from InDesign CS is that CS3’s INX interchange format can only be opened by version CS2 – so opening a CS3 document in CS requires two conversions and access to all three versions.
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<b>Fade to black</b>
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Effects such as Drop Shadow and Feather were added in InDesign CS2, adds seven more: Gradient Feather, Directional Feather, Bevel and Emboss, Satin, Inner Shadow, Inner Glow and Outer Glow.
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Most provide a way to add highlights and shadows inside and outside an object or text for a faux-3D effect. All offer a wide range of controls over the object itself, stroke, fill or text with choices over angle, smoothness, style, depth, shading and opacity. They’re undeniably useful tools, though as with Drop Shadow and Feather, it’s very easy to go overboard and end up with a cheesy result.
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