Aurora Skycam has become the first company in the world to use Canon's new ME20F-SH HD video camera to capture stunningly detailed low-light footage of one of the aurora borealis.

The footage, filmed earlier this month in Norway, records the borealis in very high clarity, revealing colour and detail that has “opened up new creative possibilities”, according to Aurora Skycam’s Anders Hanssen. “It’s the most amazing camera out there. A revolution when it comes to night time photography. We were immediately blown away and will never use anything else from now on.”

Launched earlier this month at IBC, the ME20F-SH was operating in almost near-darkness, allowing the team to exploit the camera’s capabilities.

“We wanted to show the possibilities of shooting real time footage with wide-angle lenses,” said Hanssen. “It’s one thing filming with a 24mm or a 35mm lens but you don’t get to show the whole beauty of the Northern Lights. You need to go wider.”

“We had every lens we needed, but mostly we used the CN-E14mm Cinema EOS lens which, together with the camera, was really a fantastic combination."

"Recording was via the camera’s SDI output to an external recorder and we could control the camera and lens combination using the RC-V100 Remote Control which was superb and meant that the camera was kept perfectly still at all times.”

“I now have 14.5 hours of footage,” revealed Hanssen. “So I have some editing to do. All the footage we recorded was done during a new moon phase so there was no light in the sky at all. It was as dark as it’s possible to get. It’s the first time anyone has managed to film aurora clearly with a wide-angle lens."

As well as filming the Northern Lights, the team were able to film the Milky Way in unparalleled detail.

"For the first time, it’s possible to get good recordings of the Milky Way, constellations and nebula, too," said Hanssen.  "With an 800 percent dynamic range it is truly incredible what it can see. All things combined it is a perfect camera to see the unseen beauty of the night sky."