Intel has started shipping Xeon E5 V3 chips based on the Haswell microarchitecture to workstations makers, and the chips could be on your desktop this summer. As usual, specialist vendors such as Boston will be first – with the likes of Dell and HP to follow. Apple is likely to upgrade its Mac Pro too, which currently uses a single Intel Xeon E5 V2.

The Xeon E5 chips typically go into two-socket workstations. The new chips, code-named Grantley, will succeed former V2 chips. These were code-named Romley, and are based on the Ivy Bridge microarchitecture.

"We think ... it's going to be a very powerful product," Intel CEO Brian Krzanich said during an earnings call on Tuesday.

The Grantley chips have already started shipping to cloud and high-performance computing customers who build their own computing gear, Krzanich said. Most chips ship out of the factory to workstations makers, who test the chips, design workstations and then make products commercially available.

The predecessor Romley chips are still out there, but Grantley will step in as customers look to upgrade workstations. The Xeon E5 V3 'Grantley' chips will have DDR4 memory controllers, and memory DIMMs are expected to be available from Micron, Kingston and others this quarter. The chip will have more processing cores than did its predecessors.

Intelalso sells Xeon E3 chips for single-socket workstations and E7 chips for servers with four sockets or more.