“If you take a close look, you’ll notice a bird’s face,” says Jorge. “The ‘b’ and ‘d’ act as eyes, while the ‘i’ and ‘r’ form the peak and nose”

Focus: logo design

Suizopop

Suizopop (suizopop.net) is an emerging studio in Monterrey, Mexico, formed by Rosendo Guzman, Carlos Carreño and Jorge Páez, a trio with strong drive.

“We belong to the generation of change and transition,” says Jorge. “We grew up in the 90s, so we’ve seen this world change madly. We want design to be for all and not for the few. There’s a revolution out there and we want to be part of it.

Jorge Páez notes that squared sheets work great when constructing letters, but Suizopop also works with more freeform lettering such as calligraphy

“We love Swiss Style,” Jorge explains, “and we know it serves as an easy solution for many out there, but it got so over exploited, it drained out. We are obviously influenced by grid design, we understand it’s a fundamental piece of the process, but we know as well that it isn’t flawless. We are working on being as ‘morphable’ as possible in terms of graphic solutions.”

An example is Birdiedaboy, a branding project for a local photographer, Abraham Esparza who works under the name. The trio, working with colleague Oscar Fuentevilla, created a ‘wordmark’ using a combination of Adobe Illustrator, offset print, and pen and paper.

A personal project by Jorge. The display typeface was inspired by Art Deco, King Kong and beauty

“This crazy-longboarder and technology-lover needed an identity that stood up among others; one that reflected his personality and his work, says Jorge. “It had to be as easy to apply as a watermark for photography. We tried mainly to avoid icons and focused on an exquisite wordmark, which can be used as a whole, or only as a bird when small sizes are required, or as a seal.”

"El Realito skate park is located in one of the most hostile neighbourhoods in the city of Monterrey, but it has acted as a way for kids to stay away from crime and excel at something they like,” says Jorge. “We worked pro bono at the invitation of Birdie [photographer Abraham Esparza]”