With every blockbuster being heralded by seemingly dozens of different posters, each targeted at a different demographic from young to old or Marlboro-chewing male to Bridget Jones female, Digit celebrates the single, truly iconic images that convinced us to see celluloid masterpieces – and a few turkeys too.

Alien

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(1979, Dir: Ridley Scott)<BR>
Poster by Steve Frankfurt and Philip Gips
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A technical illustrator, production designer and TV commercial director before moving into films, it’s no surprise that Scott wanted an unusually high level of involvement in the advertising of his movies.
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For his second film, Alien, his instructions to Frankfurt and Gips were to intrigue rather than base its appeal around stars (which the film didn’t have) or the alien itself (which would have robbed the film of much of its impact).
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The poster succeeds because of these decisions. The iconic hatching egg features green and yellow smoke, so you know something nasty is soon to break out, while the cage bars below tell you there’s no escape. And after reading the tagline, you’re sure this is going to be a very scary film indeed.
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<h2>Attack of the 50ft Woman</h2>
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