Birds do it, bees do it, and even designers and brand agencies do it. Yet is the overt use of sex in design and branding falling out of fashion? Digit explores the new discourse in sex and design.




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Sex is second nature. After our primary instinct for self-preservation comes that for sex; a powerful biological and psychological human impulse behind which lies the genetic imperative for reproduction. It’s an obvious but powerful tool for designers and brands to find a way to our heads, our hearts and most importantly, our pockets.
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But the way that sex is used by the creative community is being forced to change by our environment. Society is saturated with sexual images, nudity is virtually omnipresent and the presentation of sexual desire in the media and images around us is practically ubiquitous. Therefore, there has never been more need for innovation and fresh creative perspective when using sex as a tool for communication.
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The use of sex – in both subtle and blatant ways – as a means of generating consumer appeal can have dramatic effects. In the late 80s and early 90s it was a lever that could be relied upon by brands and creatives to both shock and grab attention, and to get their product to the front of the public consciousness.
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Joshua Berger, creative director of design firm Plazm, which authored the book XXX: The Power of Sex in Contemporary Design, says: “The use of sex, at a very basic and visceral level, exploits our natural human desires for love, comfort, companionship, and happiness. In spite of its obvious nature, utilizing sex to sell product still works.”
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<b>Hello Boys</b>
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