Founded in 1999 by a disillusioned IT refugee, interactive design agency Randommedia now boasts the BBC and Sony on their client list.

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Randommedia was born out of disappointment. Way back at the end of the last century Victor Benady, Random’s CEO, was banging his head against a brick wall. “I was working in the IT research and development unit at the London Institute (now University of the Arts) and became very frustrated by the machinations of further education,” he says. 
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“Good ideas seemed to be stifled by bureaucracy and ego.” A “disappointing experience,” it motivated him to go out there and do it for himself, setting up Randommedia in October 1999. 
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“Randommedia was always supposed to be an interactive design shop that offered best of breed creativity and innovation, rather than simply a Web-design company,” he says. “We’ve stuck to our guns ever since.”
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Now the company describes itself as a digital ideas agency, and works offline as well as online. “The glue that holds it all together is the ideas,” says Benady. The ideas paid off and the company has established itself with clients such as Sony and the BBC, plus a clutch of awards including interactive BAFTAs, Webbys, and a D&AD Yellow Pencil.
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Benady and his team refuse to label themselves, preferring instead to state that they specialize in: “Quite simply, fantastic digital ideas that resonate.” Neither do they admit to a house style, and if forced to sum up Randommedia’s work, Benady says: “Our work is never what you expect. The pitches we win are the ones where we give clients what they least expected.”
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An example of that happening is their work for Sony. Brought in as a wild card on a competitive pitch for Ratchet & Clank, the company “knocked their socks off with an ambitious idea”. Since then Sony has become a long-term client.
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“SCEE [Sony Computer Entertainment Europe] has given us carte blanche to do some pretty crazy stuff over the years,” says Benady. 
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For example, most recently they developed the site and campaign for the Sony PlayStation game The Getaway: Black Monday. “We went in with a really ambitious idea that they totally fell for,” says Benady. “Basically, we produced an interactive narrative using a lot of video elements. For the first time we had to deal with and manage a film crew of 30 and a load of actors.”
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<h2>Merging TV and Web</h2>
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