Tate Modern is currently hosting an exhibition of paintings by Wassily Kandinsky, the master of twentieth century modernism.

The show, Kandinsky: The Path to Abstraction, which opened at Tate Modern on Thursday June 22 and runs until 1 October features many paintings by the Russian artist which have never been seen before in the UK.

There is an interesting report about the show in the Independent:


The exhibition shows his move from figurative painting, inspired by folklore scenes in Russia, to an abstract style, where descriptive details were stripped away and elements such as houses or horses were reduced to calligraphic lines and planes of colour.


Two of the highlights, Composition VI and Composition VII, date from 1913 when Kandinsky reached "pure abstraction," just before the outbreak of war, Mr Rainbird said. Kandinsky was also an influential theorist who laid down his theories of painting in writing, most notably in the avant-garde tract Concerning the Spiritual in Art, which the Tate is re-printing in a new edition to coincide with the exhibition.

Kandinsky's descent into the cod spiritualism of Theosophy aside, this show is not one to miss.